Visual Fields Test

My appointment with my glaucoma specialist went well, except for the fact that I was back to the 20/200 line and even that wasn’t as crisp as a my second PostOp appointment on 27 April (I also believe it was slightly worse than my unscheduled appointment with Dr. Ayres this past Friday.)  I’m glad everything looks great, but that isn’t helping me see better.  As per Dr. Pro’s (and Dr. Ayres’) recommendation, I’ve scheduled an appointment with Dr. Garg, the retina specialist I saw earlier this year.  I have a feeling I know how that appointment will go too.  Everything will look fine, but my vision will still suck.  Call me Nostradamus.  I’ll let you know how things go on 18 or 19 May.

Central Vision Visual Fields Test at Wills Eye

Central Vision Visual Fields Test at Wills Eye

One of the problem I’ve noticed is that I seem to have more blind spots, especially in my central vision.  When Eliz and I were working with Jane at softball, I noticed I had trouble following the ball when Eliz would flip the ball to me from three to five feet unless I looked to my right.  I’m not sure what the above test indicates, but since I don’t think I’ve ever had this particular visual fields test I don’t think there is anything to compare it to.

Visual Fields Test Machine in the Glaucoma Dept. at Wills Eye

Visual Fields Test Machine in the Glaucoma Dept. at Wills Eye

After my appointment at Wills Eye, Eliz and I walked up Walnut Street and stopped into the Associated Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired.  I had contacted them just before we moved Salon Supplies + Interiors and ForYourSalon.com out of that disaster of a building (which has been condemned, by the way.)  Between the move and setup of the business and waiting to see how things went with the surgery, I didn’t follow up.  Looking back, that seems dumb.  As it stands now, I don’t think things will improve dramatically, if at all.  You may say I’m a pessimist, but I disagree.  I would call myself a realist.  Sure, I can hope and wish, but I’ve been doing that since I was a small child.  Maybe I learn something and gain some confidence.

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Going the Wrong Way

Since Wednesday or Thursday, I’ve noticed that my vision didn’t seem to be as good as it was earlier in the week.  By Friday, after talking with Eliz, we decided it was probably a good idea to try and visit Dr. Ayres, the surgeon that removed the cataract (and performed the endothelial transplant in Dec. ’08.)  Fortunately, they were able to squeeze me into their busy schedule at Wills Eye at noon on Friday.

We didn’t have to wait long in the waiting room.  I was very curious about reading the chart.  The E was not a problem.  I could see the SL on the next line, but it didn’t seem as sharp as my previous appointment about 10 days earlier.  I could not read the OPLB line.  That was a step backward.

When Dr. Ayres came in, I told him about what was going on.  He took a look and said everything seemed about the same as my previous appointment.  No signs of retina detachment, the new lens was still in place, and there was no signs of rejection on the previously transplanted endothelia.  My IOP was at seven, which was down from 10 at my previous appointment.  As he put it, the good news is that it is not a problem from the surgery, but that means I don’t really have any way of fixing the issue.  He prescribed a non-steroidal eye drop just in case there was a little swelling that he didn’t notice.  He said it was like Advil in drop form.

On Tuesday I have a scheduled appointment with Dr. Pro, who is my glaucoma doctor.  I want to have a Fields test, because one of the things I have noticed is more blind spots, especially in my central vision.  Hopefully, he’ll find something that can be corrected.

So, it seems I’ve missed my opportunity to go to the movies or a Phillies game.  It might also be time to learn how to do things without much sight.  I was waiting for the surgery before I tried anything new, but I think it is time.

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